College Gymnastics & Scholarship Opportunities Scholarship
Stats.com

 84 schools sponsored varsity level Gymnastics teams during 2016:

              Athletic Scholarships Average Athletic
  Number Number of teams Varsity Athletes (1) Average team size limit per team ** Scholarship (2)
Division  of Schools Men's Women's    Men       Women  Men's Women's    Men       Women     Men       Women 
NCAA I 63 15 61 297 1,083 20 17 6.3 12  $           16,249  $          16,349
NCAA II 7 - 7 - 140 - 20 5.4 6  $             5,617  $             6,963
NCAA III 14 1 14 20 270 20 18 - -  $                      -  $                      -
Totals  84 16 82 317 1,493 19 18          $           12,276  $          12,492

  (1) Varsity Rosters may include reserve participants and do not reflect club or intramural team participants.

**  Women's NCAA Division I gymnastics is a head-count sport for purposes of awarding athletic scholarships and is an equivalency sport for all other divisions, so partial scholarships can  be awarded to meet the limit per school.  For example, an NCAA Division II school can award 12 female gymnasts each a 1/2 scholarship and still meet the  limit of 6 per school.   See our page on scholarship limits for more information. Gymnastics is a separate and distinct sport from collegiate Acrobatics and Tumbling.

(2) Average Athletic Scholarship is the average award per athlete for ALL varsity sports sponsored by the specific school. Some athletes receive full awards, some receive partial and many receive none. Additionally some sports within a school may be fully funded, some partially and some sports provide no athletic scholarships. Private schools generally have higher tuition than public schools and the average award will reflect this.     2016

 

New Data!  2016 Athletic Scholarship Averages for NCAA I Gymnastics teams

The following are the results of our 2016 survey of NCAA I schools that sponsored varsity gymnastics teams during their 2015-16 fiscal years. The results reflect the average number of athletic scholarships and the average award per team, as well as the low and high range for the number and average dollar amount of scholarships awarded per team:
2016 NCAA baseball
Women's NCAA I Gymnastic Teams Average Low  High
# of Scholarships Awarded 14 12 16
Average Scholarship per team  $      40,172  $          23,482  $        63,337
Men's NCAA I Gymnastic Teams Average Low  High
# of Scholarships Awarded 16 14 19
Average Scholarship per team  $     18,190  $        12,882  $        31,573

Number of scholarships awarded is per team, so for 4 year schools typically only 25% or so will be available for the incoming (i.e. freshmen) class. Data includes responding schools only, programs that do not award athletic scholarships are not included in these results.
 
 
Coach's Corner  New Feature!

We asked some coaches from around the country to take time from their busy schedules and provide some brief input for high school & middle school gymnasts hoping to compete in College. Here are some thoughts we believe are particularly helpful:
 

 

Debbie Yohman, University of Pittsburgh (NCAA I)

The goal for gymnasts hoping to compete in college should be Level 10 (or better) skills / routines / execution and COMITTMENT as that is what most teams are  exclusively recruiting.  A good, recruitable Level 10 gymnast  should be strong, fit, competitive, and love to work hard – this increases their chances to stay healthy and compete consistently .   

There is a place for Level 9’s or lower and that is generally a club team at a university

I believe one of the biggest surprises to athletes / families about college gymnastics is that it's not as “easy” as they expected.  Programs  have a level of expectation that begins with coming in as good as you were when you were recruited (if not better) and then you must continue to earn that scholarship, or even as a walk-on , that spot on the team.  The training is different, the goals change from a developmental program to a highly competitive team environment,  the work is intense and the standards high.  While there is a limit on the hours you must spend in the gym, the number of people to help you achieve has increased: coaches, trainers, doctors, strength & conditioning experts, nutritionists, academic advisors, etc.  Schools invest a significant amount of funding and resources to help athletes succeed, so  it’s really not a “free” ride … you must do your part to deserve that investment. 

 NCAA gymnasts can expect to spend 20 hours a week training and conditioning. If they have injuries or prehab needs they can expect up to another hour per day in the training room before and/or after practice. That will decrease going into and throughout the season due to travel time, and as the focus changes from quantity to quality. 

A common mistake is for athletes to slack off once they get a scholarship or spot on a team. The gymnast that doesn't continue to progress, get stronger and  train to compete will come in lacking, and usually disappoint themselves, their coaches and their teammates.
 
 

Elise Ray, University of Washington (NCAA I)

Each program and coach has different needs for their team, but one thing is consistent: the athlete being recruited has to be good enough to better the team, it’s that simple. It’s important and valuable to communicate with the coaches of the programs you’re interested in and get feedback to find out what specially they’re looking for.  

One of the most common mistakes is waiting too long to begin the recruiting process. Unfortunately, recruiting has started so early …  much too early! It’s important to reach out to the schools and coaches you’re interested in, get on their radar and make yourself known.

 

NCAA rules require us to stay within a 20-hour limit for all athletic related activities. This means practice, conditioning, meetings, etc. Everything has to stay within 20 per week. For most gymnasts, this is actually a lot less than what they’re used to. But, the role of academics is more intense in college. To be perfectly honest, gymnasts are pretty incredible; they’ve learned at an early age how to balance a very time demanding sport while keeping up with school, family and friends. Gymnasts usually have a great foundation to be a very successful collegiate athlete.

 Being a student-athlete in any sport is a full time job. It takes incredible time management, commitment, sacrifice and discipline. It’s hard work and the student-athletes have very full days and busy schedules. Student-athletes are not regular college students by any means. It’s important to recognize the difference. But, student-athletes, in my opinion are some of the most impressive young people because they develop qualities and skills that set them up for a very successful life. There are countless benefits to being a student-athlete, you just have to be willing to work for it.

 
 
 

Mark Williams, University of Oklahoma (NCAA I) 

Recognize that coaches are seeking individuals who will push the team score on several events. Being able to do routines with 15+ start values is essential. And being able to compete on events that scores above a 14.00 will get you more attention from coaches. If you have an event that is more your specialty, highlight it with your recent competition standings and scores. Lastly, show that you are in good shape, strong on rings, swing well on pommel horse, and you are willing to train not only the gymnastics but the conditioning and cardio while remaining free of major injuries. 

Because there are very few college programs, NCAA coaches can be very selective about who are offered scholarships and roster spots. Normally, most programs will only have one or two scholarships to offer each year.

For boy’s gymnastics through middle school and high school, it is very important to be enrolled in the right club gymnastics situation as most high school programs do not have the necessary system in place for college preparation. Choosing a club program that produces gymnasts who regularly compete at the Junior Olympic Championships and the P & G Championships are preferred to recreational programs. Selecting a club that has a knowledgeable coach, who has experience as an athlete competing at an elite or collegiate level of gymnastics, is also helpful. The training that is received during the ages of 8-16 is vital to the preparation necessary to compete for a college team.

Send recruiting information directly to coaches prior to your junior year in high school. Most of the recruiting for men’s gymnastics is still done during the summer between  junior and senior year, and through the early signing period in November. Follow-up up with videos and results from your competitions through that season and ask for feedback concerning your chances of being recruited. Send links of competition routines and supplement these with things you might be working on in the gym. Don’t be afraid to ask questions of the coach about what he is looking for in perspective student-athletes from both a  gymnastics and academic standpoint. Don’t wait until your senior year to reach out to coaches. Many spots will be taken by then.

 College gymnasts usually train about 20 a week throughout the year. Guys who compete on the Sr. national team and team USA will generally put in more hours than that. Though the collegiate season goes from January to April, most of my guys stay on campus through the summer and continue to train for the USA Championships. Therefore, we don’t have a lot of down time away from the sport. 

 

Paul Beckwith, Cornell University (NCAA I) 

The recruiting process in the Ivy League starts later than other schools as July 1st following the student’s junior year in high school is the earliest that an Ivy school may do an academic pre-read to determine admissibility. Most Ivies do all recruiting using the early decision application deadline of November 1, senior year. 

Ivy League schools compete  in NCAA Division 1 and go by all the recruiting rules, though due to the academic requirements there won’t be commitments made before the athlete is in 11th grade.  So while a coach might make a verbal commitment to an athlete during their sophomore year, it would be completely contingent upon the athlete being admitted. Ivy coaches cannot make an early verbal commitment with an athlete that prohibits the gymnast from visiting the other Ivy institutions, therefore, the athlete should visit all schools that are of interest during or just after their junior year.
 

Since there are no athletic scholarships offered in the Ivy League, athletes need to do a financial aid pre-read after their academic pre-read. All financial aid is based on demonstrated need, and though each school determines the amount of aid to be awarded independently, each Ivy will often match the best deal so that the student is not selecting among the Ivies based on cost of attendance.

Students hoping to a compete in gymnastics at an Ivy league school such as Cornell need to be taking a challenging load of classes ( AP’s and Honors) and the GPA needs to be near a 4.0 with class rank in the top 10%. The SAT or ACT needs to be taken at the first opportunity so that the test can be taken again to get the scores at a minimum in the 700 range on each part of the SAT or a 30 on the ACT.   

Most importantly, these  scores and GPA benchmarks are just rough guidelines for minimums and certainly do not guarantee admissibility to any particular institution!  Each school has its own admissions process, and it is up to the athlete to find out from the coach just what that institution’s process entails and how many athletes the coach can support. Additionally benchmarks coaches look for in some sports may also differ from benchmarks coaches look for in other sports within the same school.

Above all, the Ivy League schools are academically very difficult, and academics will always be the athlete’s number one priority in college! The student must be comfortable attending school where most students were at the top of their high school class.

 

Interactive Map - US College Gymnastics Programs

 

Quick Stats -  US Colleges that sponsored varsity Gymnastics teams in 2015:

            Average Athletic     SAT Math  
Schools with Varsity        Roster Size (1)    Scholarship (2)     Annual Tuition & Fees   Average (3) %
Gymnastics Programs    City           State   Division  Men  Women     Men    Women    In-State    Out-of-State  25% 75% Admitted
University of Alaska Anchorage Anchorage AK NCAA I              -             15 14,155 13,705 4,608 15,264
Auburn University Auburn  AL NCAA I              -             20 31,710 28,131 8,592 25,776 530 645 83%
University of Alabama Tuscaloosa AL NCAA I              -             20 22,268 17,587 9,826 24,950 500 630 51%
University of Arkansas Fayetteville AR NCAA I              -             15 19,644 17,490 6,824 18,914 510 620 62%
Arizona State University Tempe AZ NCAA I              -             13 19,723 19,685 9,484 23,830 520 640 84%
University of Arizona Tucson AZ NCAA I              -             15 23,330 26,539 9,952 28,416 75%
Sacramento State University Sacramento CA NCAA I              -             19 9,705 8,267 5,472 16,632 420 530 73%
San Jose State University San Jose CA NCAA I              -             20 13,699 12,842 5,472 16,632 470 600 60%
Stanford University Stanford CA NCAA I 21             19 24,609 25,103 44,184 44,184 700 790 5%
University of California-Berkeley Berkeley CA NCAA I 16             19 9,725 11,167 11,220 34,098 640 770 16%
University of California-Davis Davis CA NCAA I              -             19 11,610 11,617 11,220 34,098 560 700 40%
University of California-Los Angeles Los Angeles CA NCAA I              -             21 19,261 14,571 11,220 34,098 610 750 19%
U.S. Air Force Academy Colorado Springs CO NCAA I 20             14 full ride! full ride!  -   -  620 710 17%
University of Denver Denver CO NCAA I              -             16 25,155 36,432 41,112 41,112 560 660 76%
Southern Connecticut State University New Haven CT NCAA II              -             20 4,105 4,196 4,600 14,886 410 510 72%
University of Bridgeport Bridgeport CT NCAA II              -             25 16,267 18,196 27,900 27,900 410 490 61%
Yale University New Haven CT NCAA I              -             14  -   -  45,800 45,800 700 800 6%
George Washington University Washington DC NCAA I              -             17 18,315 25,460 48,700 48,700 610 700 44%
University of Florida Gainesville FL NCAA I              -             16 17,105 22,547 4,477 25,694 590 690 46%
University of Georgia Athens GA NCAA I              -             20 18,477 18,907 8,590 26,800 570 670 56%
Iowa State University Ames IA NCAA I              -             20 17,819 18,685 6,648 19,534 530 680 87%
University of Iowa Iowa City IA NCAA I 19             20 17,393 17,468 6,678 26,008 540 700 81%
            Average Athletic     SAT Math  
Schools with Varsity        Roster Size (1)    Scholarship (2)     Annual Tuition & Fees   Average (3) %
Gymnastics Programs    City           State   Division  Men  Women     Men    Women    In-State    Out-of-State  25% 75% Admitted
Boise State University Boise ID NCAA I              -             18 10,654 10,603 4,621 17,473 460 570 77%
Illinois State University Normal IL NCAA I              -             17 12,867 14,364 10,470 18,060 74%
Northern Illinois University Dekalb IL NCAA I              -             22 18,978 17,754 9,278 18,557 480 580 51%
University of Illinois  Champaign IL NCAA I 17             14 24,390 24,806 12,036 26,662 700 790 59%
University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago IL NCAA I 20             16 9,925 17,468 10,584 22,974 530 660 74%
Ball State University Muncie IN NCAA I              -             24 16,785 15,890 8,682 23,948 500 590 60%
University of Kentucky Lexington KY NCAA I              -             17 18,712 22,595 9,403 21,675 510 640 72%
Centenary College of Louisiana Shreveport LA NCAA III              -             13  -   -  33,500 33,500 470 570 66%
Louisiana State University  Baton Rouge LA NCAA I              -             15 26,886 27,730 9,722 26,886 510 630 77%
Springfield College Springfield MA NCAA III 20             20  -   -  32,980 32,980 460 600 71%
Towson University Towson MD NCAA I              -             15 12,354 11,440 6,004 17,682 500 590 59%
U.S. Naval Academy Annapolis MD NCAA I 18            - full ride! full ride!  -   -  610 710 8%
University of Maryland-College Park College Park MD NCAA I              -             19 25,960 28,161 7,612 27,905 620 730 48%
Central Michigan University Mount Pleasant MI NCAA I              -             21 11,039 11,010 11,550 23,670 470 593 69%
Eastern Michigan University Ypsilanti MI NCAA I              -             22 10,577 12,191 8,244 24,287 450 560 69%
Michigan State University East Lansing MI NCAA I              -             17 18,627 15,244 13,200 34,965 540 690 66%
University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI NCAA I 23             13 24,756 21,622 13,158 41,578 660 760 32%
Western Michigan University Kalamazoo MI NCAA I              -             16 21,617 19,520 9,794 24,026 84%
Gustavus Adolphus College Saint Peter MN NCAA III              -             15  -   -  39,930 39,930 61%
            Average Athletic     SAT Math  
Schools with Varsity        Roster Size (1)    Scholarship (2)     Annual Tuition & Fees   Average (3) %
Gymnastics Programs    City           State   Division  Men  Women     Men    Women    In-State    Out-of-State  25% 75% Admitted
Hamline University Saint Paul MN NCAA III              -             25  -   -  35,710 35,710 490 570 70%
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Minneapolis MN NCAA I 20             14 11,185 9,927 12,060 19,310 620 750 45%
Winona State University Winona MN NCAA II              -             20 4,038 2,982 6,860 12,360 63%
Lindenwood University Saint Charles MO NCAA II              -             20 2,744 4,575 15,230 15,230 450 540 53%
Southeast Missouri State University Cape Girardeau MO NCAA I              -             17 8,979 10,520 6,047 11,439 433 620 85%
University of Missouri-Columbia Columbia MO NCAA I              -             19 14,692 18,994 8,220 23,247 530 660 78%
North Carolina State University  Raleigh NC NCAA I              -             17 15,482 20,361 6,038 21,293 600 680 52%
University of North Carolina  Chapel Hill NC NCAA I              -             16 17,783 17,504 6,423 31,505 620 720 28%
University of Nebraska Lincoln NE NCAA I 21             16 15,602 17,522 6,480 20,400 520 660 70%
University of New Hampshire Durham NH NCAA I              -             19 16,319 17,549 13,670 26,650 510 610 80%
Rutgers University-New Brunswick New Brunswick NJ NCAA I              -             18 18,678 18,098 10,954 25,732 570 700 60%
Cornell University Ithaca NY NCAA I              -             21  -   -  47,050 47,050 680 770 14%
Ithaca College Ithaca NY NCAA III              -             21  -   -  39,532 39,532 59%
SUNY College at Brockport Brockport NY NCAA III              -             28  -   -  6,170 15,820 480 580 49%
SUNY College at Cortland Cortland NY NCAA III              -             19  -   -  6,170 15,820 49%
U.S. Military Academy West Point NY NCAA I 18            - full ride! full ride!  -   -  590 700 9%
Bowling Green State University Bowling Green OH NCAA I              -             19 16,097 12,329 9,096 16,404 450 580 53%
Kent State University  Kent OH NCAA I              -             21 18,732 13,878 10,012 17,972 470 580 84%
Ohio State University Columbus OH NCAA I 27             19 16,033 16,500 9,168 25,668 620 730 53%
University of Oklahoma Norman OK NCAA I 18             19 22,942 17,814 4,128 16,902 540 670 81%
Oregon State University Corvallis OR NCAA I              -             17 18,504 19,248 7,650 24,822 500 620 78%
Pennsylvania State University University Park PA NCAA I 20             12 19,326 18,697 16,572 29,522 560 670 50%
            Average Athletic     SAT Math  
Schools with Varsity        Roster Size (1)    Scholarship (2)     Annual Tuition & Fees   Average (3) %
Gymnastics Programs    City           State   Division  Men  Women     Men    Women    In-State    Out-of-State  25% 75% Admitted
Temple University Philadelphia PA NCAA I              -             19 20,244 18,582 14,006 24,032 510 620 62%
University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia PA NCAA I              -             22  -   -  42,176 42,176 690 780 10%
University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA NCAA I              -             18 24,674 21,447 16,872 27,268 600 690 53%
Ursinus College Collegeville PA NCAA III              -             23  -   -  45,890 45,890 83%
West Chester University  West Chester PA NCAA II              -             20 2,489 1,389 6,820 17,050 500 590 53%
Brown University Providence RI NCAA I              -             15  -   -  46,408 46,408 670 780 9%
Rhode Island College Providence RI NCAA III              -             15  -   -  6,530 17,228 410 510 65%
Texas Woman's University Denton TX NCAA II              -             15  -  7,999 5,650 16,510 430 540 85%
Brigham Young University Provo UT NCAA I              -             23 8,535 6,358 5,000 5,000 580 680 47%
Southern Utah University Cedar City UT NCAA I              -             19 9,501 7,811 5,416 17,874 450 570 61%
University of Utah Salt Lake City UT NCAA I              -             12 18,365 20,382 6,889 24,111 520 650 81%
Utah State University Logan UT NCAA I              -             23 14,308 9,516 5,320 17,320 450 590 98%
College of William and Mary Williamsburg VA NCAA I 19             15 14,231 14,970 12,428 34,132 630 740 33%
Seattle Pacific University Seattle WA NCAA II              -             20 9,678 9,404 35,100 35,100 510 615 83%
University of Washington Seattle WA NCAA I              -             17 19,063 17,716 11,305 32,424 580 700 55%
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Eau Claire WI NCAA III              -             20  -   -  7,361 14,934 84%
University of Wisconsin-La Crosse La Crosse WI NCAA III              -             23  -   -  7,585 15,158 76%
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Oshkosh WI NCAA III              -             18  -   -  6,422 13,995 80%
University of Wisconsin-Stout Menomonie WI NCAA III              -             12  -   -  7,014 14,760 91%
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Whitewater WI NCAA III              -             18  -   -  6,519 14,092 390 570 82%
West Virginia University Morgantown WV NCAA I              -             18 17,844 18,623 6,960 20,242 480 580 86%
                         


(1) Varsity Rosters may include reserve competitors and do not reflect club or intramural team participants.

(2) Average Athletic Scholarship is the average amount of athletically related student aid per athlete for ALL varsity sports sponsored by the specific school. Some athletes receive full awards, some receive partial and many receive none. Additionally some sports within a school may be fully funded, some partially and some sports provide no athletic scholarships. Private schools generally have higher tuition than public schools and the average award will reflect this.

(3)  SAT Math Average: For each school this represents the range where the middle half of the admitted students scored, so 1/4 scored below the lower end (25th percentile) and 1/4 scored above the upper end (75th percentile).

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